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Tough Topics

This guide offers local services and resources covering a variety of community needs, including suicide, substance abuse, sexual assault, gender identity, as well as many others.

From the PPLD Collection

Grieving for the Sibling You Lost

If you've lost a sibling, you feel sad, confused, or even angry. For the first time, a psychotherapist specializing in teen and adolescent bereavement offers a compassionate guide to help you discover your unique coping style, deal with overwhelming emotions, and find constructive ways to manage this profound loss so you can move forward in a meaningful and healthy way.

Living When a Loved One Has Died

If you are grieving, Living When a Loved One Has Died can help. This gentle, reassuring book explains the bewildering feelings that arise after a loved one's death and helps you honestly confront your loss. While the journey through grief is neither straightforward nor simple, Living When a Loved One Has Died will be an invaluable companion as you sort through your feelings, take steps toward healing, and begin to build a new life.

The Grieving Teen

Writing not only about but also for teenagers, Fitzgerald adeptly covers the entire range of situations in which teens may find themselves grieving a death, whether the cause was old age, terminal illness, school violence, or suicide. She helps teens address the gamut of strong and difficult emotions they will experience and the new situations they will face, including family changes, issues with friends, problems at school, and the courage needed to move forward with one's own life.

Talking about Death

Talking about Death is a classic guide for parents helping their children through the death of a loved one. With a helpful list of dos and don'ts, an illustrated read-along dialogue, and a guide to explaining death, Grollman provides sensitive and timely advice for families coping with loss. This redesigned and updated edition explains what children at different developmental stages can and can't understand about death; reveals why it's crucial to be honest about death; helps you understand the way children express emotions like denial, grief, crying, anger, and guilt; and discusses children's reactions to different kinds of death, from the death of a parent to the death of a pet.

Liberating Losses

When someone dies, those left behind are expected to grieve. But, as taboo as it is to admit, not every death brings great sadness. Labeled "nontraditional grief response" by therapists and counselors, a positive reaction following a death is becoming more common, especially now that drugs and medical treatments keep people alive much longer than they or their families might wish. Sometimes we are relieved that our loved one is no longer suffering; at the other end of the spectrum, a death might finally free us of an abusive or unhappy relationship. In either case, the cultural expectation for sadness, loneliness, and despair only adds to the guilt and conflict felt by many "relieved grievers."

Grief Recovery for Teens

In this compassionate guide, you'll discover how your mind can affect the way you feel physically, and discover body-oriented skills to help your body heal after experiencing loss. You'll also find ways to relieve feelings of anxiety and confusion that can make your physical symptoms worse, and finally begin the healing process.

Mourning a Death in the Family

Dealing with a death in the family is one of the most upsetting things that a young person can face. Whether it is a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, member of the extended family, or pet, this kind of loss can be heartbreaking. This volume discusses the variety of forms that grief can take. It reminds readers that everybody has different responses to the death of a loved one and that those responses themselves change over time. Also discussed is the impact that the loss of a family member can have on the family members who remain. The concluding chapter discusses ways to memorialize and remember family members who have passed away.

Sometimes Life Sucks

A thorough, gentle book for teens to navigate their personal experience of grief, and for parents and teachers to use with teens struggling with loss Whether it's the death of a grandparent, pet, school friend, a teen fatality, a peer with terminal illness, living without a parent, or the death of a celebrity, teenagers experience loss in many ways and must struggle to come to terms with their shock and grief. Full of helpful tips, first person stories, and friendly advice, this resource helps teens navigate the loss of those they love. It covers such concerns as What can I do to help a friend who's grieving? What if I don't want to go to the funeral? What can I do when nothing seems to help? and Will other people think I don't care if I start to feel happy again?

Grief Is a Journey

Since no two people experience grief in the exact same way, Grief Is a Journey offers a variety of self-help strategies for coping with grief. It delineates the many ways we can create personal and private therapeutic rituals throughout our grief journey. This book also offers counsel on when--and where--to seek professional assistance.

The Grieving Process

Source: Well Cast

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